PAEP Hosts 11th Annual Scholastic Art & Writing Awards

Tess Becket, a senior at 21st Century Cyber Charter School, smiled as she presented her entry at the 2019 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards ceremony on March 30th at the School District of Philadelphia.

PAEP hosted the 2019 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, in collaboration with its partner, the Philadelphia Writing Project, on March 30th at the School District of Philadelphia. This year marks the 11th time PAEP has administered the program in Philadelphia on Scholastic’s behalf. The 2019 awards received over 2,000 entries in visual arts, the highest tally to date in that category, and nearly 1,000 entries in writing. The students’ work was judged by a renowned panel of artists and arts educators, who based their scores on originality, technical skill and personal expression. Megan Lafferty, PAEP Director of Administration, greeted guests and served as master of ceremonies.

Philadelphia City Councilman At-Large David Oh spoke about the importance of investing in youth and embracing the arts at the 2019 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards ceremony on March 30th at the School District of Philadelphia.

Philadelphia City Councilman At-Large David Oh, a longtime supporter of the program, was also at the ceremony and acknowledged the students’ accomplishments. In his speech, he praised their creative thinking, expression and individuality, whether it was shown through art or writing. “Our investment in the future is an investment well served,” he said, “when we invest in all of you [the students].”

Daniel Embree, director of national programs for the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers, the nonprofit organization which heads the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards alongside its local partners, was also onhand to attend the ceremony. He acknowledged that judges, artists, writers, professionals, and creatives had looked at the students’ work and decided, “This is special. What this student is saying is special.”

Dr. Diane Waff of the Philadelphia Writing Project spoke of the history of the program, stating that today’s students join a long lineage of painters, designers, entrepreneurs and teachers, at the 2019 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards ceremony on March 30th at the School District of Philadelphia.

Dr. Diane Waff, director of the Philadelphia Writing Project, echoed David’s sentiments. She acknowledged the trail blazed by other Gold Key winners like Truman Capote, Sylvia Plath and Philadelphia’s own Husnaa Hashim, saying that the students now join their legacy. Winners of the competition often go on to become painters, graphic designers, museum curators, entrepreneurs, scientists and teachers, she said. “But whatever you choose,” she added, “I hope your Scholastic Award today will fuel your dreams and enable your creative pursuits.”

Gold Key winners, recipients of the highest honor, also had a chance to present their work. Marina Garagozzo, a junior at Friends Select School, submitted “Mia Cara Madre,” a mixed-media painting of her mother and “moi!,” a plaster cast of her own face. “Last year, I competed but I got a Silver Key and an Honorable Mention. This is my first time getting a Gold Key,” she said.

Students stood in line to present their entries at the 2019 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards ceremony on March 30th at the School District of Philadelphia.

Keshawna Logan, a senior at Souderton Area High School, submitted a visual art submission for the first time called “Senior Year: Caught in the Whirlwind,” a self portrait. “It was about figuring out my future after high school,” she said. “The background is very swirly because I’m confused [about] what’s gonna happen.”

“Painting myself was very different—I’ve never painted myself before,” she added. “But I enjoyed doing it. It was lots of fun for me.”

Some of the award-winning visual art entries adorned the walls at the 2019 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards ceremony on March 30th at the School District of Philadelphia.

Ali Meltzer, a junior at Wissahickon High School, submitted an essay titled “Big Fish and Second Chances.” “I was examining the true nature of education as seen, both, in my experiences and anecdotally from a rabbi that I met who, kind of, changed me a lot,” she said as she laughed.

“I submitted some stuff last year and received an Honorable Mention. This year, I submitted four pieces, got one Gold Key and two Silver Keys,” she added.

Students pick up their citations from Philadelphia City Council marking their participation in the event at the 2019 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards ceremony on March 30th at the School District of Philadelphia.

The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, which began in 1923 in Pennsylvania, has long recognized students for their written and visual work in exhibition, publication and scholarship—with the highest honors being bestowed upon Gold Key members at local ceremonies. This year’s ceremony honored a remarkable group of students, grades 7-12, who received the prestigious Gold Keys for their exemplary art and writing submissions. Each student also received a citation from Philadelphia City Council, regionally recognizing them for their work.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

PAEP Presents 14th Annual Poetry Out Loud Regional Finals

Participants at the Poetry Out Loud Regional Finals smiled with Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Presenter Susan H. Goldberg (center, multicolored scarf) at the conclusion of the ceremony on Saturday, Jan. 26.

On Saturday, Jan. 26, PAEP hosted the 2019 Poetry Out Loud Regional Finals on behalf of the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts (PCA). The competition, launched by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the Poetry Foundation, encourages the nation’s youth to learn about great poetry through memorization and performance, and works with state agencies for expansion. The PCA implemented its Poetry Out Loud program through its Arts in Education Partner (PAEP) and the Pennsylvania Parent Teacher Association.

Fourteen students from Philadelphia-area high schools competed in the regional finals. Each student recited three poems, judged by a panel of performers, poets and cultural and business leaders from across the region. The students received mentorship from teachers and principals at their schools, as well as some of the judges on the panel—including PA Council Member Susan H. Goldberg, Director of Education at Delaware Theatre Company Charles Conway, Curator of Exhibits at the African American Museum Richard Watson, poet and adjunct professor at Stockton University Peter Murphy, and Director Emeritus of the Drexel University Theatre Program, Department of Performing Arts, Adelle Rubin.

Junius Jones (left), a senior at The Haverford School, and Cornelia Yoyo (right), a senior at the Girard Academy Music Program, placed first and second, respectively, at the 14th annual Poetry Out Loud Regional Finals at the School District of Philadelphia on Saturday, Jan. 26.

The winners of the regional finals were Cornelia Yoyo, who placed second, and Junius Jones, who placed first. Cornelia, a senior at the Girard Academy Music Program, recited “Violins” by Rowan Ricardo Phillips, “What Women Are Made Of” by Bianca Lynne Spriggs, and “Sanctuary” by Jean Valentine. Junius, a senior at The Haverford School, recited “It Couldn’t Be Done” by Edgar Albert Guest, “Thoughtless Cruelty” by Charles Lamb, and “Flounder” by Natasha Trethewey.

This is not Junius’ first foray at the regional finals. In 2016, he also represented his school at the competition, reciting “Invictus” by William Ernest Henley, “I, Too” by Langston Hughes and—for the first time—“Flounder” by Natasha Trethewey. As to why he returned to the poem, he said he enjoyed it.

“I was speaking with him [Richard Watson] and he told me to put more caesuras in it [stops or pauses in a line] and it worked,” Junius said.

Junius also thanked his teacher, Ms. Taylor Smith-Kan, for her support at both competitions.

First place winners of the regional finals will go on to compete at the PA state finals on March 4, 2019, at the State Museum of Pennsylvania.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Matter Bounces, Shatters & Changes Course at William H. Ziegler School

The Franklin Institute Traveling Science Show presenter David Henry Wrigley looks toward the ceiling where the pressure from liquid nitrogen blew the lid off of a container at William H. Ziegler School on Tuesday, Nov. 13.

Have you ever seen a metal ball shrink, or a rubber ball—once soft, flexible and bouncy—shatter upon impact? At a science assembly event at William H. Ziegler School on Tuesday, Nov. 13, students grade 4 through 8 were able to witness this firsthand.

Sponsored by The Franklin Institute, the science assembly event featured a “hot & cold” presentation demonstrating how temperature affects matter. Presenter David Henry Wrigley used extremely cold liquid nitrogen, with a boiling point of -320℉, to show that the different states of matter—solid, liquid and gas—can change form when placed in the right conditions.

David began by saying that matter—anything that has mass and takes up space—is made up of tiny particles called molecules, which are attracted to each other and can move past one another. The degree to which they move determines their state of matter: molecules that don’t move direction and simply vibrate in place make up a solid; molecules that slowly move past one another make up a liquid; and molecules that quickly move past one another make up a gas.

Students at William H. Ziegler School raise their hands to answer a question about helium at a Franklin Institute-sponsored science assembly event on Tuesday, Nov. 13.

A student at William H. Ziegler School raises their hands to partake in an experiment at a Franklin Institute-sponsored science assembly event on Tuesday, Nov. 13.

Students demonstrated this throughout the presentation by making small circles with their fists  (“molecules”) and wiggling their arms back and forth at varying speeds. Each speed demonstrated a different state of matter. Students also volunteered to be “molecules” and/or scientists onstage.

David then explained that even humans are made up of molecules. The atmosphere is made up of 78 percent nitrogen and 21 percent oxygen, both gases. The oxygen, in particular, reacts to the broken down carbon compounds in our food, which produces carbon dioxide. Through the exchange of gases in our lungs, some of the oxygen is retained and we exhale 78 percent nitrogen, 15 to 18 percent oxygen, 4 to 5 percent carbon dioxide and smaller amounts of other gases.

Jayleene, a 7th grader at William H. Ziegler School, was surprised to learn this. “They’re are all around us,” Jayleene said about the molecules. “[They’re] in the environment and our bodies.”

David then went on to perform several experiments with the students demonstrating the different states of matter.

The Franklin Institute Traveling Science Show presenter David Henry Wrigley rotates a balloon filled with helium in a bowl of liquid nitrogen, causing the molecules within it to lose energy and condense.

With a decorated pink balloon named BoBo filled with helium, David (with protective gloves on—as direct contact with liquid nitrogen can cause frostbite) began to rotate the balloon in a container filled with liquid nitrogen. As he continued to rotate the balloon, it began to shrink. According to David, the molecules in the balloon (which were once moving past each other at rapid speeds) began to slow down, causing them to get closer together and take up less space. Once he removed the balloon from the liquid nitrogen, however, it began to expand again. The molecules within it were re-exposed to room temperature, causing them to regain speed and consume more space.

In another experiment, David used a metal ball and a small board with a hole in it to demonstrate how temperature affects metal. With a few student volunteers, he was quickly able to show that the ball would not fit through the hole. After sitting it in liquid nitrogen for a few minutes, however, he was then able to successfully fit the ball through the hole. By applying the cold pressure of liquid nitrogen, the molecules in the ball moved ever so slightly, shrinking in size just enough so that the ball could fit through the hole.

Students look on as Traveling Science Show presenter David Henry Wrigley removes a metal ball from a canister of liquid nitrogen to prepare it for an experiment.

As the metal ball sat in liquid nitrogen, David showed the students what the substance’s effect would be on a rubber ball. The presenter demonstrated the properties of the ball by bouncing it, saying that its molecules could bend, twist, compress and return to their original size. Once introduced to liquid nitrogen, however, the ball’s molecules behaved differently: they became rigid and stopped moving past one another, causing the ball to harden and shatter upon impact.

For many students, this was the standout part of the afternoon.

“My favorite part was when he put the ball into the [liquid] nitrogen and then when he took it out of it, he threw the ball to the floor and then it cracked,” said Mia, a 7th grader at William H. Ziegler School.

For Mia, specifically, she had never seen this before. “It was nice to experience something new,” she said.

David closed the presentation by saying that nitrogen is all around us, even in the air we breathe. You can take the nitrogen “home” with you and tell your friends about the active molecules moving around in your bodies and lungs.

The science assembly event was one of several held at PAEP’s STEAM After School sites this fall, all sponsored by The Franklin Institute. The topics change throughout the year, exposing students to a realm of subjects under the STEAM umbrella.

Posted in STEAM Program | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

A Case for Architecture: Art, Science, and Critical Thinking

Architecture has been at the forefront of human achievement for many (many) millennia, and a true tribute to the human spirit of survival. From the simple to the ornate, each structure carries with it a personality and purpose of its own. And yet, despite the fact that all children have the urge to build, we often wait until people are in higher education before teaching them the inner secrets of the beauty in the buildings around us. As the STEM movement continues to gain traction, it seems like a good time to implement programs that let children discover the truth on their own before they have to sign up for a 101 course.

Capitalizing on Nature 

Parents and educators of all kinds know that kids don’t need to be told what to do if they’re giving a pile of blocks. Children build on instinct and they delight in trying new formations to test the limits of their creations. And while few early education professionals would deny the importance of playtime, they may not see the full scope of opportunity in front of them. By integrating higher level concepts in a structured yet independent environment, it’s possible to build strong critical thinking skills at a very young age. It’s never too early to push kids to do more than they think they can do, and it all starts with the introduction of the right projects.

Schools of Thought 

Some tend to think of art and science as two separate subjects, but it doesn’t take very long to uncover the fallacy of this assumption. By its very nature, architecture is the combination of numbers and aesthetics. It has the power to cast problems in a very different light, allowing children to view them from different perspectives. A child who has this type of early exposure can start to see how ideas can be melded to fit different scenarios. It’s far easier for kids to understand ratios in a classroom when they can envision constructing one interior layer of blocks for every two layers of the exterior. Architecture programs also give kids insight into history, culture, and social studies.

Setting Up Success

Kids don’t necessarily need expensive tools or user-friendly instruction manuals to construct something new. In fact, they usually learn more if they start from scratch. Some kids engage in this type of high-level play entirely on their own, but some may need a helping hand to prove they’re more capable than they realize. Experts have already seen how the introduction of simple toys like Legos can lead to unstructured high-level play, allowing children to collaborate and share new methods without a formal moderator. Those who show an interest and aptitude for a logical and creative approach to building may benefit from a more structured environment where they can really develop their skills.

Making the Time 

Educators and parents who do make the time to expose kids to the interactions found in early architectural programs find that children have better problem-solving skills and more colorful imaginations. Every great inventor and thinker conceived a better reality while taking the logical steps necessary to turn their ideas into tangible results. A consistent commitment to high-level play teaches children to see failure as a learning opportunity and not as a reason to abandon their skills.

Encouraging Independent Problem Solving 

It’s easy for adults to think the key to being an asset in a child’s life is to be involved. While there’s no doubt that taking an interest can help foster a child’s sense of well-being and security, there’s often more value in knowing when to step back and be quiet while a child figures out their own solution to a problem. Unless it’s a situation where the child will be in physical danger, chiming in with ideas can create dependent children who fear making their own decisions. A creative architecture project that allows children to see the bigger picture and watch their efforts come together encourages independence naturally while stimulating their own sense of competence.

Teamwork for Life 

Formal education has long followed a set framework regardless of what was happening outside the four walls of the classroom, but this is all starting to change. With the advent of technology and the realization of a rapidly shifting economy, it’s no longer just the alternative educators who are knocking down traditional boundaries. Programs that give children a chance to learn from other children is a way for them to develop the teamwork skills they’re going to need when they step into the real world. By making these skills a habit as soon as humanly possible, they won’t even have to try to work well with others because they’ll already have an innate understanding of the importance of persuasion, tolerance, and listening.

Challenges for the Future 

How would a group of children encourage green living through city planning? How would they ensure that their city would be able to scale if an additional million people moved in overnight? How would they may an existing city better with a limited amount of resources? Challenging these children to come up with ideas is not only a way to improve their critical thinking skills but also a way to get them prepared to make the decisions that will build a better world. And because children see problems very differently than adults, it may even inspire new ideas for established professionals facing the very same problems.

There are plenty of programs that claim to boost critical thinking skills, but the concepts of architecture truly have the power to deliver on its promise. By combining facets of math, science, art, history, and culture, children have the opportunity to learn outside the boundaries of a traditional classroom or unfocused playtime.

Guest contributor Justin Havre is a Calgary, CA native and owner of Justin Havre & Associates. Justin believes what we teach our children today is an investment in tomorrow.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

A Case for Architecture: Art, Science, and Critical Thinking by Justin Havre

Architecture has been at the forefront of human achievement for many (many) millennia, and a true tribute to the human spirit of survival. From the simple to the ornate, each structure carries with it a personality and purpose of its own. And yet, despite the fact that all children have the urge to build, we often wait until people are in higher education before teaching them the inner secrets of the beauty in the buildings around us. As the STEM movement continues to gain traction, it seems like a good time to implement programs that let children discover the truth on their own before they have to sign up for a 101 course.
Capitalizing on Nature
Parents and educators of all kinds know that kids don’t need to be told what to do if they’re giving a pile of blocks. Children build on instinct and they delight in trying new formations to test the limits of their creations. And while few early education professionals would deny the importance of playtime, they may not see the full scope of opportunity in front of them. By integrating higher level concepts in a structured yet independent environment, it’s possible to build strong critical thinking skills at a very young age. It’s never too early to push kids to do more than they think they can do, and it all starts with the introduction of the right projects.
Schools of Thought
Some tend to think of art and science as two separate subjects, but it doesn’t take very long to uncover the fallacy of this assumption. By its very nature, architecture is the combination of numbers and aesthetics. It has the power to cast problems in a very different light, allowing children to view them from different perspectives. A child who has this type of early exposure can start to see how ideas can be melded to fit different scenarios. It’s far easier for kids to understand ratios in a classroom when they can envision constructing one interior layer of blocks for every two layers of the exterior. Architecture programs also give kids insight into history, culture, and social studies.
Setting Up Success
Kids don’t necessarily need expensive tools or user-friendly instruction manuals to construct something new. In fact, they usually learn more if they start from scratch. Some kids engage in this type of high-level play entirely on their own, but some may need a helping hand to prove they’re more capable than they realize. Experts have already seen how the introduction of simple toys like Legos can lead to unstructured high-level play, allowing children to collaborate and share new methods without a formal moderator. Those who show an interest and aptitude for a logical and creative approach to building may benefit from a more structured environment where they can really develop their skills.
Making the Time
Educators and parents who do make the time to expose kids to the interactions found in early architectural programs find that children have better problem-solving skills and more colorful imaginations. Every great inventor and thinker conceived a better reality while taking the logical steps necessary to turn their ideas into tangible results. A consistent commitment to high-level play teaches children to see failure as a learning opportunity and not as a reason to abandon their skills.
Encouraging Independent Problem Solving
It’s easy for adults to think the key to being an asset in a child’s life is to be involved. While there’s no doubt that taking an interest can help foster a child’s sense of well-being and security, there’s often more value in knowing when to step back and be quiet while a child figures out their own solution to a problem. Unless it’s a situation where the child will be in physical danger, chiming in with ideas can create dependent children who fear making their own decisions. A creative architecture project that allows children to see the bigger picture and watch their efforts come together encourages independence naturally while stimulating their own sense of competence.
Teamwork for Life
Formal education has long followed a set framework regardless of what was happening outside the four walls of the classroom, but this is all starting to change. With the advent of technology and the realization of a rapidly shifting economy, it’s no longer just the alternative educators who are knocking down traditional boundaries. Programs that give children a chance to learn from other children is a way for them to develop the teamwork skills they’re going to need when they step into the real world. By making these skills a habit as soon as humanly possible, they won’t even have to try to work well with others because they’ll already have an innate understanding of the importance of persuasion, tolerance, and listening.
Challenges for the Future
How would a group of children encourage green living through city planning? How would they ensure that their city would be able to scale if an additional million people moved in overnight? How would they may an existing city better with a limited amount of resources? Challenging these children to come up with ideas is not only a way to improve their critical thinking skills but also a way to get them prepared to make the decisions that will build a better world. And because children see problems very differently than adults, it may even inspire new ideas for established professionals facing the very same problems.
There are plenty of programs that claim to boost critical thinking skills, but the concepts of architecture truly have the power to deliver on its promise. By combining facets of math, science, art, history, and culture, children have the opportunity to learn outside the boundaries of a traditional classroom or unfocused playtime.

Guest contributor Justin Havre is a Calgary native and owner of Justin Havre & Associates. Justin believes what we teach our children today is an investment in tomorrow.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The Need for Pre-K Creativity in the Classroom

Implementing an arts-based curriculum at an early age has been proven to enhance students’ confidence, creativity, and academic performance. It is no question, at this point, that the arts are integral to a well-rounded education.

However, there is a lack of robust arts programming within pre-K environments.

Too often, these classrooms are structured to deliver pre-literacy skills in reading and math without considering the fact that children at this age learn best through “play.” The creative environment fostered by the arts and art-making provides children with rich experiences through which they can develop these pre-literacy skills. This leaves educators with a major challenge: How do we promote arts integration in pre-schools that will take advantage of how children learn best at this age.

 The ABCs of Pre-Literacy

Pre-literacy skills cover much more than a child’s ability to identify letters, numbers, or shapes. Important skills like oral language awareness, as well as knowledge of the alphabet, and an understanding of common print concepts such as the fact that print moves from left to right and from up to down on a page, compose the foundation for becoming successful readers.

While knowing letters and sounds are important, a child’s oral language skills are the most significant factors in reading success. The foundation for reading development is language; it is strongly tied to a child’s growth in reading and writing. By about age 5, research shows that most children have learned approximately 5,000 words. Furthermore, those words aren’t acquired through passive listening alone. Instead, verbal interactions and multiple experiences support the growth of language. Many at-risk children lack the necessary interventions at home that promote the acquisition of a rich and varied vocabulary.

Children entering kindergarten are expected to have some pre-literacy skills — especially the ability to carry a brief conversation. A teacher would also want students to pay attention and react to stories; have knowledge of some alphabet letters as well as the sounds these letters make, and some basic print concepts, such as knowing that printed words convey meaning.

All of these skills are important because we live in a language-and print-rich environment.

Create Rich Play Environments for Learning

At Emlen School, a PAEP artist read the book I Need My Monster by Amanda Knoll to a group of four-year-olds.  Each child was given a sheet of white paper with a black shape glued onto it. Children then created their own monsters, incorporating the shapes and embellishing them using colored markers. The artist then asked each child to tell a story about their own monster.

This project encouraged oral language development and built an understanding that a story has a beginning, middle and end. The addition of the art-making activity tapped into children’s needs for visual, tactile, and aural-rich stimuli, providing a structure for acquiring pre-literacy skills through creative play.

This is just one example of integrating a visual arts experience in support of pre-literacy learning. Music, drama, and dance also provide robust experiences for children to explore learning through play.

For more pre-K arts resources, visit our website.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Ahmir Thompson Joins PAEP’s Board of Directors

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

We are excited to announce that Ahmir Thompson (“Questlove”) has joined the Philadelphia Arts in Education PartnershipBoard of Directors.

You may know Ahmir from his award-winning work with The Roots, who happen to be the house band of The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, or as a New York Times bestselling author, Broadway and music Producer, DJ, and culinary entrepreneur.

I know him differently.  A former student of mine, I have had the pleasure of seeing Ahmir grow from a small boy into the larger-than-life star that he is today.  And I saw the way that the arts made him come alive in his youth.  That’s all we want for each student that PAEP serves.

All of us at PAEP are so pleased that Ahmir will work with us as we provide crucial arts education programming to children just like him in Philadelphia.  We know that, given access to this curriculum, our students will be set on a path to achieve their dreams—whatever they may be.

Read the full press release.

Please join us in welcoming Ahmir to the PAEP family.

Pearl Schaeffer

CEO

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

After School STEAM Enrichment Receives a Grant

The Philadelphia Arts in Education Partnership (PAEP) proudly announces that its After School STEAM Enrichment program has received a $1.2 million grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Education through the 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) to continue its work to improve core academic learning for underserved and at-risk students through its arts-integrated with science and mathematics model.

$23.1 million in federal funding has been awarded to 64 school districts and community-based organizations in 29 counties across the state. The intention of these grants is to supplement educational opportunities to enhance the work teachers and students are doing in the classroom. The 21st CCLC federal funding program will enable PAEP to expand its current 21st CCLC STEAM program to five additional School District of Philadelphia schools serving students in grades 5-8.

The $1.2 million will be dispersed over a three year period enabling PAEP to invest $400,000 each year in services and resources for the School District of Philadelphia. PAEP’s grant will serve over 256 students each of the three years and will provide students at the five schools with unique after school educational opportunities. Additionally, PAEP will hire 20 teaching artists annually, who will integrate science and math learning into instruction in theater, music, visual art, and dance.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Residencies 2013-14

As we begin to transition into the new school year PAEP acknowledges the great work that took place in our 2013-14 Art Residencies funded by the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts . Our residencies took place in 40 schools and community sites and our Directory Artists exposed students of all age groups to a variety of visual and performing art forms. Residencies have become essential to the culture of our schools and community sites, giving students meaningful lessons through the arts.

This past year, the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts asked all of the regional partners to develop a story in a form of a video to demonstrate the power of the arts and how the PCA funds provide vitality to our work in Pennsylvania’s schools and communities. PAEP took this opportunity to share the breadth and depth of our Artist Residency Program and how our arts integration model has provided whole school transformations. We believe that the arts appeal and positively affect all types of students. Throughout the video you will hear from our important stakeholders: principals, teachers, teaching artists, students, and parents about the impact of this work and the role they see the arts playing in the future.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Long Term Residency: Art and Eve

In 2004, the Philadelphia Arts in Education Partnership (PAEP) was selected to partner with the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts‘ (PCA) Arts in Education Division. As the PCA regional partner, PAEP designs, implements, manages, and provides financial support for arts residencies in schools and community sites throughout southeastern Pennsylvania. PAEP trains visual and performing arts teaching artists to integrate the arts with academic curricula. PAEP manages 30-40 visual and performing arts-making residencies per year with students in preK-12 classroom and community sites. PAEP also reviews and accepts local artists annually for inclusion in the Directory of Pennsylvania’s Artists in Education. This Directory is primarily used as a tool by schools and community sites to identify artists for the Artist in Residency Program.

In addition to our Residency program, PAEP also provides support for Long Term Residencies (LTR’s) which are a more in depth approach to student learning in and through the arts. LTR’s consists of a minimum of 60 days and engages learners in the creative process through artistic and core curricular goals and objectives. Each LTR is uniquely designed and developed between a Directory Teaching Artist, Project Director, and host site.

One of PAEP’s most established LTR’s, “Art and Eve”, is in its second year at Grover Washington Middle School. Art and Eve” is an in-school arts residency program that promotes interest in science, mathematics, and technology for adolescent girls through art and design projects that challenge their preconceived and frequently negative notions about STEM subjects. This project targets socially at-risk girls and aims to build a sense of competence and confidence, critical thinking and problem solving skills, and the ability to work together and function as a team, all skills necessary for the 21st century workforce.

Art and Eve” was created through collaboration with technology teacher Gina Griffith, Teaching Artist Lisa Volta, the Philadelphia Arts in Education Partnership (PAEP), and Grover Washington Jr. Middle School. “Art and Eve” continues the mission of promoting positive growth within the school’s female population and increases the likelihood of their future success as well as supporting them in becoming better citizens for our community and nation.

This past year the girls have been exposed to a variety of exciting new topics including: computer software mastery, research skills utilizing technology, creation of blogs, jewelry making, and most recently, designing and fabricating light boxes. Since “Art and Eve” strives to expose students to the possibility of furthering their education while also setting personal goals for themselves, artist Lisa Volta and teacher Gina Griffith thought it would be a valuable opportunity to take the students on a field trip to Moore College of Art and Design in Philadelphia. During the visit, the girls learned about the Youth Artist Program that Moore offers to middle and high school students over the summer months to help them strengthen their artistic skills. The girls also toured the campus, including different art departments and gallery spaces. Within these departments they saw the latest technologies and learned how they are relevant to the projects they have worked on in “Art and Eve”.  At the conclusion of the tour, the girls walked away with a true excitement for college and the realization that they can achieve a higher education.

With continuous support from all partners, “Art and Eve” provides a safe space for girls to engage in learning while also being able to share their thoughts and ideas with one another. PAEP is excited to announce that the program will continue its work at Grover Washington Middle School in the 2014-15 school year.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment